Review of: Any Legacy 

reviewed by AlCielo on 07/27/2011
AlCielo
Review of Any Legacy
I loved the individual parts of this Dostoevskian reflection, but it always seemed that there was something greater--as in "the sum is greater"--and it turned out the real strength wasn't the acting, photography, editing etc. (you don't need me to enumerate these achievements) but the way you added the individual pieces, or more accurately contrasted them, like Eisenstein's approach to montage (not "shot plus shot" but "shot times shot"): angles, speeds, camera distance et al., UNTIL the death scene. For the living reflections of the narrator--like his life--were apparently a series of disconnects, but with death, his (and our) awareness shifts, and for the first time the pieces connect, underscored by the ecstatic guitar music.

The best short films don't try to be long films. They examine small moments and make them big, and in this respect they are greater than features. Yours succeeds on all counts. It's a masterpiece, but not a miniature. You've given us a post-death perspective without requiring us to die. This is what great art does. I'm awed and grateful for the blessing of your film.

Other Reviews by AlCielo 299

  • A review of Chase the Night
    by AlCielo on 07/25/2013
    "Chase the Night" is a taut character-driven action story with an important theme. My major reservations about this draft are at the deepest level of structure (how everything fits together and why). The only essential task a writer has is to maintain the audience's attention for the duration of the viewing (or reading). If the audience isn't immersed in the story, no amount... read
  • A review of Unseen
    by AlCielo on 03/13/2013
    "Unseen" is based on a strong premise--a young man hounded by guilt for his brother's kidnapping seeks revenge. Having such a clear, important concept is critical--if the basis for the story is unaffecting, then it doesn't matter how well written the screenplay is. My goal here is to help you develop the strengths of your premise. To do that, I'm going to focus on weaknesses... read
  • by AlCielo on 06/27/2012
    Combining Dante and Leone is a gutsy choice, but not necessarily a futile one (filming the Inferno would be another matter). The Inferno is first and foremost a quest / journey (un cammin) and the spaghetti western protagonists normally undertake a quest. Both Dante and Leone present a larger-than-life world (but one that depicts our own with accuracy and restraint). In this... read
+ more reviews